Frequently Asked Questions and Answers
FAQs

1. Which authority conducts elections to the offices of the President and Vice-President of India ?

Election Commission of India (ECI) Under Article 324(1) of the Constitution of India, the Election Commission of India, interalia, is vested with the power of superintendence, direction and control of conducting the elections to the offices of the President and Vice-President of India. Detailed provisions are made under the Presidential and Vice Presidential Elections Act, 1952 and the rules made thereunder.

2. Which authority conducts elections to Parliament?

Election Commission of India (ECI) The same Article 324 also vests in the Commission the powers of superintendence, direction and control of the elections to both Houses of Parliament. Detailed provisions are made under the Representation of the People Act, 1951 and the rules made thereunder.

3. Which authority conducts elections to the State Legislative Assemblies and Legislative Councils?

Election Commission of India (ECI) Article 324 (1) also vests in the Commission the powers of superintendence, direction and control of the elections to both Houses of the State Legislature. Detailed provisions are made under the Representation of the People Act, 1951 and the rules made thereunder.

4.What is the present composition of the Election Commission?

A Three - Member Body At present, the Election Commission of India is a three-member body, with one Chief Election Commissioner and two Election Commissioners.

5. What is the status Chief Election Commissioner and the Election Commissioners in terms of salaries and allowances etc.?

Equivalent to Supreme Court Judges. The Chief Election Commissioner and the two Election Commissioners draw salaries and allowances at par with those of the Judges of the Supreme Court of India as provided for by the Chief Election Commissioner and other Election Commissioners (Conditions of Service) Rules, 1992.

6. Who supervises the election work in a State ?

The Chief Electoral Officer (CEO). As per section 13A of the Representation of the People Act 1950, read with section 20 of the Representation of the People Act, 1951, the Chief Electoral Officer of a State/ Union Territory is authorised to supervise the election work in the State/Union Territory subject to the overall superintendence, direction and control of the Election Commission.

7. Who appoints the Chief Electoral Officer?

Election Commission of India (ECI) The Election Commission of India nominates or designates an Officer of the Government of the State/Union Territory as the Chief Electoral Officer in consultation with that State Government/Union Territory Administration.

8. Who supervises the election work in a District?

The District Election Officer (DEO) As per section 13AA of the Representation of the People Act 1950, subject to the superintendence, direction and control of the Chief Electoral Officer, the District Election Officer supervises the election work of a district.

9. Who appoints the District Election Officer?

Election Commission of India (ECI). The Election Commission of India nominates or designates an Officer of the State Government as the District Election Officer in consultation with the State Government.

10. Who is responsible for the conduct of elections in any Parliamentary or Assembly constituency ?

Returning Officer (RO) The Returning Officer of a parliamentary or assembly constituency is responsible for the conduct of elections in the parliamentary or assembly constituency concerned as per section 21 of the Representation of the People Act 1951.

11. Who appoints the Returning Officer?

Election Commission of India (ECI) The Election Commission of India nominates or designates an officer of the Government or a local authority as the Returning Officer for each of the assembly and parliamentary constituencies in consultation with the State Government/Union Territory Administration. In addition, the Election Commission of India also appoints one or more Assistant Returning Officers for each of the assembly and parliamentary constituencies to assist the Returning Officer in the performance of his functions in connection with the conduct of elections.

12. Who is responsible for the preparation of electoral rolls for a Parliamentary or Assembly Constituency?

Electoral Registration Officer (ERO) The Electoral Registration officer is responsible for the preparation of electoral rolls for a parliamentary / assembly constituency.

13. Who conducts the poll at a polling station?

Presiding Officer The Presiding Officer with the assistance of polling officers conducts the poll at a polling station.

14. Who appoints the Electoral Registration officer?

Under section 13B of the Representation of the People Act, 1950, the Election Commission of India, in consultation with the State / UT Government, appoints an Officer of the Government or the Local Authorities as the Electoral Registration Officer. In addition, the Election Commission of India also appoints one or more Assistant Electoral Registration Officers to assist the Electoral Registration Officer in the performance of his functions in the matter of preparation / revision of electoral rolls.

15. Who appoints Presiding Officers and Polling Officers?

District Election Officer (DEO) Under section 26 of the Representation of the People Act 1951, the District Election Officer appoints the Presiding Officers and the Polling Officers. In the case of Union Territories, such appointments are made by the Returning Officers.

16. Who appoints Observers?

Election Commission of India (ECI) Under section 20B of the Representationof the People Act 1951, the Election Commission of India nominates officers of Government as Observers (General Observers and Election Expenditure Observers) for parliamentary and assembly constituencies. They perform such functions as are entrusted to them by the Commission. Earlier, the appointment of Observers was made under the plenary powers of the Commission. But with the amendments made to the Representation of the People Act, 1951 in 1996, these are now statutory appointments. They report directly to the Commission.

FAQs - Parliament

1. What is the composition of Parliament of India?

According to Article 79 of the Constitution of India, the Parliament consists of President of India and the two Houses of Parliament known as Council of States (Rajya Sabha) and House of the People (Lok Sabha).

2. What is the term of Lok Sabha?

Normal Term : 5 years
Article 83 (2) of the Constitution stipulates that Lok Sabha shall have a normal term of 5 years from the date appointed for its first meeting and no longer. However, the President may dissolve the House earlier.

3. What can be the maximum number of members of the Lok Sabha?

550
The maximum number of elected members of Lok Sabha is 550. Article 81 of the Constitution provides that not more than 530 members will be elected from the States and not more than 20 members from Union Territories. Article 331 of the Constitution provides that not more than 2 members from the Anglo Indian Community may be nominated by the President of India, if in his opinion that community is not adequately represented in that House.

4. How are the members of Lok Sabha elected?

Under Sec 14 of Representation of People Act 1951, the President of India by a notification will call upon the constituencies to elect their members to the House of People. Thereafter the electors of the Parliamentary Constituencies will directly elect the Lok Sabha members. As per article 326 of the Constitution of India, elections to the House of the People shall be on the basis of adult suffrage.

5. How many members are elected by the electors of a Parliamentary Constituency?

One
Each Parliamentary Constituency will elect only one member.

6. Was this the position from the very beginning?

No Prior to 1962, there were both single - member and multi member constituencies. These multi - member constituencies used to elect more than one member. The multimember constituencies were abolished in 1962.

7. When was the 1st general election held in India?

1951-52 The first general election was held in India during 1951 - 1952.

8. At that time, what was the total strength of the Lok Sabha?

The total strength of Lok Sabha at that time was 489.

FAQs - Delimitation of Constituencies

1. There are 543 Parliamentary constituencies in India each electing one member. Who demarcates the boundaries of these constituencies?

Delimitation Commission
Under Article 82 of the Constitution, the Parliament by law enacts a Delimitation Act after every census. After coming into force commencement of the Act, the Central Government constitutes a Delimitation Commission. This Delimitation Commission demarcates the boundaries of the Parliamentary Constituencies as per provisions of the Delimitation Act. The present delimitation of constituencies has been done on the basis of 2001 census figures under the provisions of Delimitation Act, 2002. Notwithstanding the above, the Constitution of India was specifically amended in 2002 not to have delimitation of constituencies till the first census after 2026. Thus, the present Constituencies carved out on the basis of 2001 census shall continue to be in operation till the first census after 2026..

2. What is the main basis for allocation of seats to various States in the Lok Sabha?

Population of the State
Population is the basis of allocation of seats of the Lok Sabha. As far as possible, every State gets representation in the Lok Sabha in proportion to its population as per census figures.

3. Is there any reservation of seats for any special category in Lok Sabha?

Yes
In Lok Sabha there is reservation of seats for Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes. Here also census figures are taken into account.

4. On what basis is this reservation made?

Allocation of seats for Scheduled Castes and Tribes in the Lok Sabha are made on the basis of proportion of Scheduled Castes and Tribes in the State concerned to that of the total population, vide provision contained in Article 330 of the Constitution of India read with Section 3 of the R. P. Act, 1950.

5. How many seats are reserved for Scheduled Castes in Lok Sabha?

84
For Scheduled Castes, 84 seats are reserved in Lok Sabha. The 1st schedule to Representation of People Act, 1950 as amended vide Representation of People (Amendment) Act , 2008 gives the Statewise breakup.

6. How many seats are reserved for Scheduled Tribes in Lok Sabha?

47
For Scheduled Tribes, 47 seats are reserved in Lok Sabha. The 1st schedule to R. P. Act, 1950 as amended vide Representation of People (Amendment) Act , 2008 gives the Statewise break up.

7. Which are the States having the minimum number of seats in Lok Sabha?

The following States and Union Territories have one seat each in the Lok Sabha
Mizoram
Nagaland
Sikkim
Andaman and Nicobar Islands
Chandigarh
Dadra and Nagar Haveli
Daman and Diu
Lakshadweep
Pondicherry

FAQs - Registration of Political Parties

1. Is it necessary for an association to get registered by the Election Commission?

No
It is not necessary for every association to get registered by the Election Commission. Only an association or body of individual citizens of India calling itself a political party and intending to avail itself of the provisions of Part-IV-A of the Representation of the People Act, 1951, (relating to registration of political parties) is required to get itself registered with the Election Commission of India.

2. What are the benefits of registration with the Election Commission of India?

Normal Term : 5 years
The candidates set up by a political party registered with the Election Commission of India will get preference in the matter of allotment of free symbols vis-à-vis purely independent candidates. Further, registered political parties, in course of time, can get recognition as `State Party' or National Party' subject to the fulfillment of the conditions prescribed by the Commission in the Election Symbols (Reservation and Allotment) Order, 1968, as amended from time to time. If a party is recognised as a State Party', it is entitled for exclusive allotment of its reserved symbol to the candidates set up by it in the State of States in which it is so recognised, and if a party is recognised as a `National Party' it is entitled for exclusive allotment of its reserved symbol to the candidates set up by it throughout India. Recognised `State' and `National' parties need only one proposer for filing the nomination and are also entitled for two sets of electoral rolls free of cost and broadcast/telecast facilities over Akashvani/Doordarshan during general elections.

3. What is the procedure for registration?

550
An application for registration is to be submitted to the Secretary, Election Commission of India, Nirvachan Sadan, Ashoka Road, New Delhi-110001 in the Performa prescribed by the Commission. The Performa is available on request by post or across the counter from the office of the Commission. The application should be neatly typed on the party's letter head, if any, and it should be sent by registered post or presented personally to the Secretary to the Election Commission within thirty days following the date of formation of the party.
2. The application must be accompanied by the following documents/information:-
(i) A demand draft for Rs. 10,000/- (Rupees Ten Thousand Only) on account of processing fee drawn in favour of Under Secretary, Election Commission of India, New Delhi. The processing fee is non-refundable.
(ii) A neatly typed/printed copy of the memorandum/rules and regulations/Constitution of the Party containing a specific provision as required under sub-section (5) of Section 29A of the Representation of the People Act, 1951 in the exact terms, which reads "---------------(name of the party) shall bear true faith and allegiance to the constitution of India as by law established, and to the principles of socialism, secularism and democracy and would uphold the sovereignty, unity and integrity of India". The above mandatory provision must be included in the text of party constitution/rules and regulations/memorandum itself as one of the Articles/clauses.
(iii) The copy of the party Constitution should be duly authenticated on each page by the General Secretary/President/Chairman of the Party and the seal of the signatory should be affixed thereon.
(iv) There should be a specific provision in the Constitution/rules and regulations/memorandum of the party regarding organizational elections at different levels and the periodicity of such elections and terms of office of the office-bearers of the party.
(v) The procedure to be adopted in the case of merger/dissolution should be specifically provided in the Constitution/rules and regulations/memorandum.
(vi) Certified extracts from the latest electoral rolls in respect of at least 100 members of the party (including all office-bearers/members of main decision-making organs like Executive Committee/Executive Council) to show that they are registered electors.
(vii) An affidavit duty signed by the President/General Secretary of the party and sworn before a First Class Magistrate/Oath Commissioner)/ Notary Public to the effect that no member of the party is a member of any other political party registered with the Commission.
(viii) Individual affidavits from at least 100 members of the party to the effect that the said member is a registered elector and that he is not a member of any other political party registered with the Commission duly sworn before a First Class Magistrate/Oath Commissioner)/Notary Public. These affidavits shall be in addition to the furnishing of certified extracts of electoral rolls in respect of the 100 members of the applicant party mentioned at (vi) above.
(ix) Particulars of Bank accounts in the name of the party.
3. The application along with all the required documents mentioned above must be reach the Secretary to the Commission within 30 days following the date of formation of the party.
4. Any application made after the said period will be time-barred.

4. What are the criteria for recognition of a party?

A political party shall be treated as a recognised political party in a State, if and only if either the conditions specified in Clause (A) are, or the condition specified in Clause (B) is, fulfilled by that party and not otherwise, that is to say-
(A) that such party –

  • • has been engaged in political activity for a continuous period of five years; and
  • • has, at the last general election in that State to the House of the People, or, as the case may be, to the Legislative Assembly of the State, returned-
either ( i ) at least one member to the House of the People for every twenty-five members of that House or any fraction of that number from that State;
or (ii) at least one member to the Legislative Assembly of that State for every thirty members of that Assembly or any fraction of that number;
(B) that the total number of valid votes polled by all the contesting candidates set up by such party at the last general election in the State to the House of the People, or as the case may be, to the Legislative Assembly of the State, is not less than six per cent of the total number of valid votes polled by all the contesting candidates at such general election in the State.
2. The conditions in Clause (A) or Clause (B) above shall not be deemed to have been fulfilled by a political party, if a member of the House of the People or the Legislative Assembly of the State becomes a member of that political party after his election to that House or, as the case may be, that Assembly.
3. 'State' includes the National Capital Territory of Delhi and the Union Territory of Pondicherry.
4. If a political party is treated as a recognised political party in four or more States, it shall be known as a `National Party' throughout the whole of India, but only so long as that political party continues to fulfill thereafter the conditions for recognition in four or more States on the results of any subsequent general election either to the House of the People or to the Legislative Assembly of any State.
5. If a political party is treated as a recognised political party in less than four States, it should be known as a `State Party' in the State or States in which it is so recognised, but only so long as that political party continues to fulfill thereafter the conditions for recognition on the results of any subsequent general election to the House of the People or, as the case may be, to the Legislative Assembly of the State, in the said State or States.

FAQs - Contesting for Elections

1. Can a non-citizen be a candidate?

No
A non citizen cannot be a contesting candidate in the elections. Article 84 (a) of the Constitution of India envisages that a person shall not be qualified to be chosen to fill up a seat in the Parliament unless he is a citizen of India. Similar provision exists for State Legislative Assemblies in Article 173 (a) of the Constitution.

2. What is the minimum age for becoming a candidate for Lok Sabha or Assembly election?

Twenty Five Years
Article 84 (b) of Constitution of India provides that the minimum age for becoming a candidate for Lok Sabha election shall be 25 years. Similar provision exists for a candidate to the Legislative Assemblies vide Article 173 (b) of the Constitution read with Sec. 36 (2) of the R. P. Act, 1950.

3. If I am not registered as a voter in any Constituency, can I contest election?

No
For contesting an election as a candidate a person must be registered as a voter. Sec 4 (d) of Representation People Act, 1951 precludes a person from contesting unless he is an elector in any parliamentary constituency. Section 5 (c) of R. P. Act, 1951 has a similar provision for Assembly Constituencies.

4. I am registered as a voter in Delhi. Can I contest election to Lok Sabha from Haryana or Maharashtra, or Orissa?

Yes
If you are a registered voter in Delhi, you can contest an election to Lok Sabha from any constituency in the country except Assam, Lakshadweep and Sikkim, as per Section 4 (c), 4 (cc) and 4 (ccc) of the R. P. Act, 1951.

5. If some body is convicted for some offence and he is sentenced to imprisonment for 3 years, can he contest elections?

No
As per Section 8 (3) of R. P. Act, 1951, if a person is convicted of any offence and sentenced to an imprisonment of 2 years or more, this will be disqualification to contest elections.

6. Supposing he is on bail, pending disposal of his appeal, can he contest the election?

No
Even if is a person is on bail, after the conviction and his appeal is pending for disposal, he is disqualified from contesting an election as per the guidelines issued by the Election Commission of India.

7. Can a person confined in jail vote in an election?

No
Even if is a person is on bail, after the conviction and his appeal is pending for disposal, he is disqualified from contesting an election as per the guidelines issued by the Election Commission of India.

8. Every candidate is required to make security deposit. How much is the security deposit for Lok Sabha election?

Rupees Ten Thousand
As per Section 34 1 (a) of R. P. Act, 1951, every candidate is required to make a security deposit of Rs. 10,000/- (Rupees Ten Thousand Only) for Lok Sabha elections.

9. Is there any concession for a candidate belonging to Scheduled Caste or Scheduled Tribe?

Yes
The same section 34 of R. P. Act, 1951 provides that a candidate belonging to Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribe is required to make a security deposit of Rs. 5,000 (Rupees Five Thousand Only).

10. How much is the security deposit for an Assembly election?

Rupees Five Thousand
As per Sec. 34 (1) (b) of the R. P. Act 1951, a general candidate for contesting an Assembly election will have to make a security deposit of Rs. 5,000/-. A candidate belonging to Scheduled Caste / Tribe will have to make a security deposit of Rs. 2,500/- (Two Thousand and Five Hundred Only).

11. When was this change in the amount of security deposit made?

This change in increasing the security deposit was brought about in August, 1996 vide Act 21 of 1996.

12. If you are a candidate of a recognised National or State party, how many proposers you require for your nomination?

Only one
If you are a candidate of a recognised national / state party, you would require only one elector of the constituency as proposer, vide Sec. 33 of R. P. Act, 1951.

13. If you are an independent candidate or a candidate of unrecognised political party, how many proposers you require?

Ten
The same section 33 of R. P. Act, 1951 provides that as an independent candidate or a candidate of an unrecognised political party, ten electors from the constituency should subscribe your nomination paper as proposers.

14. Can a person contest elections to Lok Sabha from as many constituencies as he likes?

No
As per Section 33 (7) of R. P. Act, 1951, a person cannot contest from more than two constituencies for a Lok Sabha election.

15. Which candidates lose the deposit?

3354. A defeated candidate who fails to secure more than one sixth of the valid votes polled in the constituency will lose his security deposit.

16. What has been the maximum number of candidates in any constituency in India at any election so far?

In Modakurichi Assembly Constituency of Tamil Nadu there were 1033 contesting candidates during the general election to Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly in 1996. The ballot papers were in the form of a booklet.

17. Normally, under the Commission's norms, how far can a polling station be from your house?

Not more than 2 Kms.
According to Para 3 of Chapter II of Handbook for Returning Officers, polling stations should be set up in such a manner that ordinarily no voter is required to travel more than two kms to reach his polling station.

18. When you are walking down to your polling station, some candidate or his agent offers you a free lift to the polling station. Can you accept that offer of lift?

No
It is a corrupt practice under section 123 (5) of the R. P. Act, 1951. This offence is punishable under Section 133 of the same Act, with imprisonment which may extend upto 3 months and/or with fine.

19. Can you accept such lift when you are going back to your house after you have cast your vote?

No
The provision of Corrupt Practice under section 123 (5) as mentioned above will cover conveyance of any elector, to or from any polling station.

20. Somebody offers you some money to vote for a candidate. Can you accept such money?

No
Acceptance of money to vote for a candidate is a corrupt practice of bribery under Section 123 (1) of R. P. Act, 1951. It is also an offence under section 171-B of Indian Penal Code and is punishable with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to one year or with fine or both.

21. Somebody offers you some money, not to vote for a certain candidate. Can you accept such money?

No
The corrupt practice of bribery will also be attracted, if a person accepts money not to vote for a particular candidate.

22. Somebody makes any offer of whisky, liquor or other intoxicant or gives you a dinner to vote for a particular candidate or not to vote for him. Can you accept such offer?

No
Acceptance of any offer of liquor or other intoxicants or a dinner to vote for a particular candidate or not to vote for him is bribery.

23. Can any religious or spiritual leader instruct his followers to vote for a particular candidate, otherwise they will become object of Divine displeasure?

No
If any person induces or attempts to induce the voter to vote for any particular candidate or otherwise he will become an object of Divine displeasure, he will be guilty of the corrupt practice of exercising undue influence on a voter under sec 123 (2) of R. P. Act, 1951. It is also an offence under section 171C of Indian Penal Code and punishable with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to one year or with fine or both.

24. Can any one threaten a voter that he would be excommunicated if he votes for a particular candidate or does not vote for another particular candidate?

No
Any threat to a voter that he would be excommunicated if he votes for a particular candidate or does not vote for another particular candidate is a corrupt practice of undue influence under Section 123 (2) of R. P. Act, 1951. It is also punishable under sec 171 F of Indian Penal Code with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to one year or with fine or with both.

25. Can anyone tell another person that he should vote for a particular person, or not to vote for him, because the candidate belongs to a particular religion, caste or creed or speaks a particular language?

No
Any one telling another person that he should vote for a particular candidate or not to vote for him because he belongs to a particular religion, caste or creed or speaks a particular language is a corrupt practice under section 123 (3) of R. P. Act, 1951.

26. Is a candidate free to spend as much as he likes on his election?

No
A candidate is not free to spend as much as he likes on his election. The law prescribes that the total election expenditure shall not exceed the maximum limit prescribed under Rule 90 of the Conduct of Election Rules, 1961. It would also amount to a corrupt practice under sec 123 (6) of R. P. Act, 1951.

27. What is the limit for election expenditure in a parliamentary constituency in bigger States, like, UP, Bihar, Andhra Pradesh, M.P?

The limit for election expenditure is revised from time to time. At present the limit of expenditure for a parliamentary constituency in bigger states like U. P, Bihar, Andhra Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh is Rs. 25 lakhs.

28. What is the limit of such expenditure for an assembly constituency in these bigger States?

The limit of election expenditure for an assembly constituency in the above bigger states is Rs. 10 lakhs.

29. What was the limit for the Parliamentary and Assembly constituencies in the above States at the time of the last general election in 1999?

The limit of election expenses in the above bigger states at the time of 1999 general election was Rs. 15 lakhs for a Parliamentary constituency and Rs. 6 lakhs for an assembly constituency.

30. Are these limits uniform for all States? If not , can you tell the lowest limit for a parliamentary constituency at present?

No
The maximum limits of election expenditure vary from State to State. The lowest limit at present for a parliamentary constituency is Rs. 10 lakhs for the constituency of Dadra and Nagar Haveli, Daman and Diu and Lakshadweep.

31. Are the candidates required to file any account of election expenses?

Under section 77 of the R.P.Act, 1951, every candidate at an election to the House of the People or State Legislative Assembly is required to keep, either by himself or by his election agent, a separate and correct account of all expenditure in connection with the selection incurred or authorised by him or his election agent between the date on which he has been nominated and the date of declaration of result, both dates inclusive. Every contesting candidate has to lodge a true copy of the said account within 30 days of result of the election.

32. Who is the authority to whom such account is to be lodged?

In every state the account of election expenses shall be lodged by a contesting candidate with the District Election Officer of the district in which the constituency from which he contested lies. In the case of Union Territories, such accounts are to be lodged with the Returning Officer Concerned.

33. If a Candidate is contesting from more than one constituency, is he required to file separate accounts or only one consolidated account?

If a candidate is contesting from more than one constituency, he has to lodge a separate return of election expenses for every election which he has contested. The election for each constituency is a separate election.

34. What is the penalty if a candidate does not file his account of election expenses?

Under section 10A of the RP Act, 1951, if the Election Commission is satisfied that a person has failed to lodge an account of election expenses with the time and in the manner required by or under that Act and he has no good reason or justification for the failure, it has the power to disqualify him for a period of 3 years for being chosen as, and for being, a member of either House of Parliament or the Legislative Assembly or Legislative Council of a State.

35. What is the deadline after which no public meetings and processions can be taken out?

Ans. As per Sec. 126 of R. P. Act, 1951, no public meetings and processions can be taken out during the period of 48 hours ending with the hour fixed for the conclusion of poll.

36. On the day of poll, can any one vote in the name of another person, even with his consent?

No
On the day of poll no one can vote in the name of another even with his consent. If he does so it would amount to impersonation which is an offence under Section 171 D of Indian Penal Code. The offence is punishable with imprisonment of either description which may extend to one year or with fine or both.

37. Can any one vote more than once, even if his name is included (wrongly) at more than one place?

No
No one can vote more than once even if his name is included at more than one place. If he does so he will be guilty of impersonation which will be punishable as above.

38. If you go to your polling station and find that some body else has impersonated for you and already voted in your name, can you vote in such circumstance?

Yes
If a person finds that someone else has already voted in his name, then also he will be allowed to vote. But his ballot paper will be marked as a Tendered Ballot Paper by the Presiding Officer. This will be kept separately in the prescribed cover, as per Rule 42 of the Conduct of Elections Rules, 1961.